Skip Global Navigation to Main Content
Skip Breadcrumb Navigation
Women's History

WOMEN'S History Month 2014

A former teacher and book editor, Margaret Wise Brown authored more than 100 children’s books during her short life. Her most famous work is the children’s classic Goodnight Moon, published in 1947. She enjoyed writing her stories from her bed, as seen in

A former teacher and book editor, Margaret Wise Brown authored more than 100 children’s books during her short life. Her most famous work is the children’s classic Goodnight Moon, published in 1947. She enjoyed writing her stories from her bed, as seen in

In 1981, the U.S. Congress passed a resolution establishing National Women's History Week. The week was chosen to coincide with International Women's Day, March 8. In 1987, Congress expanded the week to a month. Every year since, Congress passes a resolution for Women's History Month in March, and the President issues a proclamation.

Women's History Month, 2014
Presidential Proclamation - Women's History Month
The White House, March, 2014

Throughout our Nation's history, American women have led movements for social and economic justice, made groundbreaking scientific discoveries, enriched our culture with stunning works of art and literature, and charted bold directions in our foreign policy. They have served our country with valor, from the battlefields of the Revolutionary War to the deserts of Iraq and mountains of Afghanistan. During Women's History Month, we recognize the victories, struggles, and stories of the women who have made our country what it is today. Read more...

International Women's Day
Press Statement
John Kerry, Secretary of State
Washington, DC. March 7, 2014

International Women’s Day is a moment to pause and reflect on the contributions of women to the world and to reaffirm our commitment to continued progress on gender equality. It’s also a powerful reminder that women are advancing peace and prosperity around the world in really remarkable ways. Read more...

Resources:
2014 National Women’s History Month Theme: Celebrating Women of Character, Courage, and Commitment
This year’s theme, Celebrating Women of Character, Courage, and Commitment, honors the extraordinary and often unrecognized determination and tenacity of women. Against social convention and often legal restraints, women have created a legacy that expands the frontiers of possibility for generations to come. They have demonstrated their character, courage and commitment as mothers, educators, institution builders, business, labor, political and community leaders, relief workers, women religious, and CEOs. Their lives and their work inspire girls and women to achieve their full potential and encourage boys and men to respect the diversity and depth of women’s experience.  Read more… 

Michelle Obama: Woman of Influence
First lady Michelle Obama serves as a role model for women who strive to balance their professional careers and their roles as mothers and wives.
http://www.america.gov/michelle_obama.html

Women of Courage
Around the world, women are challenging their societies to uphold freedom and human rights. Many take great risks to accomplish great things. Here are some of their stories.
http://www.america.gov/women-courage.html

Women in Congress
Since 1917, when Representative Jeannette Rankin of Montana became the first woman to serve in Congress, a total of 260 women have served as U.S. Representatives or Senators. This Web site, based on the book Women in Congress, 1917–2006, contains biographical profiles of former women Members of Congress, links to information about current women Members, essays on the institutional and national events that shaped successive generations of Congresswomen, and images of each woman Member, including rare photos. http://womenincongress.house.gov/

Women in the Senate
Rebecca Latimer Felton of Georgia, the first woman to serve in the United States Senate, took the oath of office on November 21, 1922. Having been appointed to fill a vacancy, Felton served for just 24 hours. The 87-year-old Felton's largely symbolic Senate service capped a long career in Georgia politics and journalism.
http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/briefing/women_senators.htm

Statistics: 
Facts for Features: Women’s History Month: March 2014
U.S. Census Bureau/U.S. Department of Commerce

Publications:
Women of Influence
Bureau of International Information Programs U.S. Department of State

eJournal USA: Educating Women and Girls
Bureau of International Information Programs U.S. Department of State

eJournal USA: Enterprising Women, Thriving Societies
Bureau of International Information Programs U.S. Department of State

U.S. Government:

White House - Women

State Department - http://www.state.gov/r/pa/ei/pix/womenshistory/2012/

Women's History Month Home Page http://www.womenshistorymonth.gov/

Department of Justice Office on Violence Against Women

Department of Labor Women's Bureau

Department of State Office of Global Women’s Issues

U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC)

Department of Health and Human Services Women's Health Information

Food and Drug Administration Office of Women's Health

National Institutes of Health / Department of Health and Human Services Office of Research on Women's Health

National Women's Business Council

Small Business Administration Office of Women's Business Ownership

Entrepreneurial Development

National Archives - Women

Women’s History Month

  • Women History Month logo with American flag and women's head silhoutte's.

    Women’s History Month

    March is Women’s History Month and an opportunity to celebrate the achievements and contributions of women to U.S. society. On March 8, International Women’s Day, Secretary Clinton will host the International Women of Courage Awards ceremony to recognize women who have shown exceptional courage

Publications

  • Women of Influence
    Women of Influence

    This collection chronicles how 21 notable American women broke new ground, some by championing equal rights for all and others by their accomplishments in fields such as government, literature, and even in war.

  • Rachel Carson: Pen Against Poison
    Rachel Carson: Pen Against Poison

    Rachel Carson was a quiet woman who stirred extraordinary controversy that persists decades after her death. Her 1962 book Silent Spring brought worldwide attention to the harm to human health and the environment wrought by mishandling of a powerful pesticide, fomenting the environmental movement.