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Visas
 
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If you are unable to attend your scheduled visa appointment at U.S. Embassy Tel Aviv, email contactus_en_TA@usvisa-info.com to reschedule your appointment. In most cases, you will not be required to pay a new fee. The request should be written in English, not Arabic or Hebrew.

What is a Visa?

Embassies and consulates place travel documents called visas inside passports, which enable travelers to arrive at a country’s entry point such as an airport or land border crossing and apply for admission from an immigration inspector. Acquiring a visa is only one step in the process that does not guarantee entry (but verifies that a U.S. consular official reviewed a traveler’s eligibility for entry).

Please note that all foreign nationals, including Israelis, acquire permission to enter the United States for a specific purpose, whether for pleasure, study, or work. If an Israelis tells an interviewing officer he intends to travel on a vacation, and receives a tourist visa, but is later discovered to have engaged in paid work in the United States, officials can detain that individual and arrange deportation. Consequences could include fines, incarceration, and a multi-year ban on future travel to the United States. The following video features Israelis speaking honestly about their experience. We hope you'll agree with them that the price of breaking U.S. immigration law is too high!  

Do I Need a U.S. Visa?

1) Travelers born in the United States and those who hold dual citizenship with the United States must enter and depart the United States on U.S. passports. Review the Embassy’s application procedures.

2) Anyone attempting to enter the United States with an Israeli passport needs a U.S. visa. If you are planning temporary travel for tourism, business, work or study, review our nonimmigrant visa procedures. If you are planning indefinite or permanent residence in the United States, immigrant visa procedures.

3) Individuals who (a) are planning temporary travel to the United States and (b) were issued passports by the countries listed below qualify for the Visa Waiver Program and should review the U.S. Customs and Border Protection ESTA procedures prior to travel.  The U.S. Department of States offers additional information at their Visa Waiver Program page.

Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brunei, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Portugal, San Marino, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan, United Kingdom 

4) Categories with special entry requirements:

a) Canadian and Mexican NAFTA professional workers

b) Citizens of Canada and Bermuda

c) Citizens of Micronesia and the Marshall Islands (USCIS Website) 

5) Are you traveling to Guam and Northern Mariana Islands? Review applicable information here and here.

Travel & Tourism in the U.S.

  • Tourism Badge

DON'T BREAK THE LAW

  • Foreign Ministry: Mall carts an embarrassment

    U.S. officials arrests Israelis every year illegally working in the United States. The Israeli Foreign Ministry urges young Israelis, "Don't break the law, we won't be able to help.”