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Women, Peace, and Security
 
Secretary Clinton delivers a speech on Women, Peace and Security, at Georgetown University. State Department photo by Michael Gross

Secretary Clinton delivers a speech on Women, Peace and Security, at Georgetown University. State Department photo by Michael Gross

On December 19, Secretary Clinton launched the National Action Plan on Women, Peace, and Security

Secretary Clinton's Remarks on Women, Peace, and Security
Hillary Rodham Clinton
Secretary of State
Washington, DC December 19, 2011

…Today, I want to focus on one aspect of peacemaking that too often goes overlooked – the role of women in ending conflict and building lasting security.  Some of you may have watched a week ago Saturday as three remarkable women – two from Liberia, one from Yemen – accepted the Nobel Peace Prize in Oslo.  For years, many of us have tried to show the world that women are not just victims of war; they are agents of peace.  And that was the wisdom behind the historic UN Security Council Resolution 1325, which was adopted a decade ago but whose promise remains largely unfulfilled.  So it was deeply heartening to see those three women command the global spotlight and urge the international community to adopt an approach to making peace that includes women as full and equal partners. 
Read the remarks and Q&A 

 

State Department Factsheet

  • Nearly half of the agreements that ended conflicts in the 1990s failed within five years of signing.[vii]
  • According to the World Bank, 90 percent of the civil wars in the 21st century occurred in countries that already had a civil war in the previous 30 years.[viii]
  • In the past 20 years, hundreds of peace treaties have been signed. According to an analysis of a sample of treaties, less than 8 percent of those treaties’ negotiators were women.[ix]
  • A UNIFEM review of 585 peace agreements from 102 peace processes revealed that since 1990, only 92 peace agreements, or 16 percent, have contained at least one reference to women or gender.[x]

Read more 

 

The White House Blog: Announcing the U.S. National Action Plan on Women, Peace, and Security
Posted by Valerie Jarrett on December 19, 2011